Category Archives: Training

FDIC: THE SMOKE COALITION

smokecoalition

FDIC Promotions and Class Sessions

Every year the Coalition offers a “special” rate membership during FDIC.  This year the focus is on fire departments. After sending last month’s email, it became apparent that the offer needs to be extended outside of FDIC as so many department budgets have been cut that traveling to FDIC isn’t an option.  For that reason, between now and the end of FDIC, the following offer will apply to all fire departments that wish to join.  Simply download the forms and send to the Coalition.This year’s fire department membership can be purchased for $75.00 (one-time fee) and includes the following:

  • 6 individual memberships to www.FireSmoke.org for training staff
  • DVD that includes:
    • ​Virtual Smoke Symposium
    • To Hell and Back: Cyanide Poisoning training video
    • Out of Air training video
    • Aftermath training video
    • Generic power point instructor presentation

The second promotion is the individual lifetime membership for $20.00 and will only be offered during FDIC.

The third promotion benefits the Firefighter Cancer Support Network (FCSN).   Thanks-a-Knot, a Phoenix-based business, brands professions and groups with knotted bracelets.  It’s mission is simple:  helping others.  As a kick-off for 2015, Thanks-a-Knot selected the fire service as its first profession to brand with red, black and gray Knots.  Stop by the booth to purchase your Firefighter Thanks-a-Knot for only $5.00 – $1.00 of which will be donated to FCSN.  The goal is to donate $1,000.00 – so please help us make the donation a reality.

Booth Number:  10042 (Maryland Street Corridor)

FDIC Classroom Sessions:

Thursday, April 23, 2015, 10:30 am:  Jason Krusen presents Smells, Bells & Spills

The focus is on the many concerns associated with everyday responses to natural gas emergencies, calls involving carbon monoxide, as well as fuel spills. Safety concerns are discussed along with how to address them and what to look for. Participants are given suggestions for leading by example on the calls and ways to change the behavior of companies operating on the scene. Participants are given ideas and guidelines for mitigating these incidents, as well as training tips for use in their departments. Recent calls involving these incidents are also discussed.

Thursday, April 23, 2015, 1:30 pm:  Rob Schnepp presents Fire Smoke:  The Impact of Inhalation, Ingestion and Absorption and Preventing the Exposure

This program unequivocally proves that if firefighters do not change personal behaviors, they can expect disease and illness to eventually rob them of a healthy life. Students gain information, including new research about personal protective equipment (PPE) and the need to prevent exposure to fire smoke because of its toxic impact on their lives. Many departments have instituted air-management protocols that will prevent exposure through inhalation, but not all understand that inhalation and absorption continue when the body is repeatedly exposed to toxic substances through PPE. Students see why carbon monoxide is not the only substance to fear on the fireground.

“Know Your Smoke” 2015 Training – New Venues!

  • April 18, 2015; Indianapolis, IN; Register
  • May 15, 2015; Illinois Fire Services Institute; Register
  • May 18-24, 2015;  Tarrant County College; Register
  • May 16, 2015; Cincinnati Fire Academy; Register
  • June 5, 2015; Yonkers, NY;  Register
  • June 6, 2015; Dutchess County, NY; Register
  • July 18, 2015; Darlington, MD; Register
  • July 19, 2015; Long Island, NY; Register
  • August 14-15, 2015; Anchorage, AK; Register
  • September 27, 2015; Allegheny County, PA; Register;
  • October 2, 2015; Lakewood, CO; Register
  • November 13, 2015; Pasco Community College, Dade City, FL; Register
  • November 14, 2015; Camilla, GA (SOWEGA Fire Chiefs; Register
  • December 5, 2015; Glendale, AZ; Register

For those who have yet to attend “Know Your Smoke” – take a moment and listen to a few thoughts about the training.

Dix Hills, NY:  Four departments chip in to purchase Cyanokit and Save a Life!A 70 year-old man was spared death – and only because he received the Cyanokit.  The Coalition is well aware of the cost of the kit, but there is no other “antidote” approved by the FDA for cyanide poisoning in smoke inhalation.  There are other means of treatment, but not as effective as the antidote that directly counteracts the hydrogen cyanide poisoning.  In this particular case, four departments shared the cost of the Cyanokit.  According to Chief Robert Fling, Dix Hills Fire Department, “soot was visible in the man’s airway.”  Chances are he would not have survived without the antidote.  As Chief Fling so aptly stated, “The Cyanokit is the “Narcan” for smoke inhalation.” Sharing the cost of the Cyanokit may not be possible for all departments, but it’s obviously a life-saving plan worth sharing. All are to be commended and thanked for being progressive and resourceful.View the story as reported by Sophia Hall, WCBS.

Fire Smoke Coalition, Inc.

323 North Delaware  Street

Indianapolis, IN  46204

(317) 690-2542

Contact Executive Director: shawn@firesmoke.org

NFA: Managing Officer Program

National_Fire_Academy
The National Fire Academy

Managing Officer Program

The National Fire Academy’s (NFA’s) Managing Officer Program is a multiyear curriculum that introduces emerging emergency services leaders to personal and professional skills in change management, risk reduction and adaptive leadership. Acceptance into the program is the first step in your professional development as a career or volunteer fire/Emergency Medical Services (EMS) manager, and includes all four elements of professional development: education, training, experience and continuing education.

How the Managing Officer Program benefits you

As a Managing Officer Program student, you will build on foundational management and technical competencies, learning to address issues of interpersonal and cultural sensitivity, professional ethics, and outcome-based performance. On completion of the program, you will:

  • Be better prepared to grow professionally, improve your skills, and meet emerging professional challenges.
  • Be able to embrace professional growth and development in your career.
  • Enjoy a national perspective on professional development.
  • Understand and appreciate the importance of professional development.
  • Have a network of fire service professionals who support career development.

The Managing Officer Program consists of:

  • Five prerequisite courses (online and classroom deliveries in your state).
  • Four courses at the NFA in Emmitsburg, Maryland.
  • A community-based capstone project.

A certificate of completion for the Managing Officer Program is awarded after the successful completion of all courses and the capstone project.

Selection criteria for the Managing Officer Program

The selection criteria for the Managing Officer Program are based on service and academic requirements.

Service Requirement

At the time of application, you must be in a rank/position that meets either the Training or Experience requirements below. Your chief (or equivalent in nonfire organizations) verifies this training and experience through his or her signature on the application.

1. Training
You should have a strong course completion background and have received training that has exposed you to more than just local requirements, such as regional and state training with responders from other jurisdictions.
This training can be demonstrated in one of many forms, which may include, but not be limited to, the following:

  • Certification at the Fire Officer I level (based on National Fire Protection Association 1021, Standard for Fire Officer Professional Qualifications).
  • Credentialed at the Fire Officer designation through the Center for Public Safety Excellence.
  • Training at the fire or EMS leadership, management and supervisory level.
  • State/Regional symposiums, conferences and workshops supporting leadership, management and supervision.
  • Other training that supports the competencies identified for the Managing Officer in the International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC) Officer Development Handbook, Second Edition.

2. Experience
You must have experience as a supervising officer (such as fire operations, prevention, technical rescue, administration or EMS), which could include equivalent time as an “acting officer.”

Academic Requirement

To be considered for the Managing Officer Program, you must have:
Earned an associate degree from an accredited institution of higher education.
OR
Earned a minimum of 60 college credit hours (or equivalent quarter-hours) toward the completion of a bachelor’s degree at an accredited institution of higher education.
In addition, you need to pass these courses before applying (available both locally and online through the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the NFA):

How to apply to the Managing Officer Program

You may submit an application package at any time during the year, but not later than Dec. 15. The first sessions of the Managing Officer Program will be offered in April and August of 2015. Students who apply by Dec. 15, 2014 will be selected for one of the 2015 sessions or a session offered in 2016 at a date to be determined.
To apply, submit the following:

  1. FEMA Form 119-25-1 General Admissions Application Form (PDF, 337 Kb). In Block 9a, please specify “Managing Officer Program.”
  2. A letter requesting admission to the Managing Officer Program. The letter should include (with no more than one page per item):
    • Your specific duties and responsibilities in the organization.
    • A description of your most substantial professional achievement.
    • What you expect to achieve by participating in the program.
    • How your background and experience will contribute to the program and to fellow participants.
    • A description of a challenging management topic in your organization.
  3. A letter from the chief of the department (or equivalent in nonfire organizations) supporting your participation in the Managing Officer Program. The letter must certify that you have supervisory responsibilities and that all of the information in the application packet is true and correct.
  4. A copy of a transcript from an accredited degree-granting institution of higher education.
  5. A resume of professional certifications including date and certifying organization.
  6. A resume of conventional and online management and leadership courses completed, including title, date, location and host of the training.

Send your application package to:

National Emergency Training Center
Admissions Office
16825 South Seton Ave.
Emmitsburg, MD 21727

Curriculum for the Managing Officer Program

Prior to Oct. 1, 2017, you may take prerequisite courses before, during and after the NFA on-campus first and second year program. Starting Oct. 1, 2017, prerequisite courses must be completed before beginning the on-campus program.
Select a course code below to see the course description.

Prerequisites First-year on-campus courses Second-year on-campus courses
“Introduction to Emergency Response to Terrorism” (Q0890) “Applications of Community Risk Reduction” (R0385) “Contemporary Training Concepts for Fire and EMS” (R0386)
“Leadership I for Fire and EMS: Strategies for Company Success” (F0803 or W0803) “Transitional Safety Leadership” (R0384) “Analytical Tools for Decision-Making” (R0387)
“Leadership II for Fire and EMS: Strategies for Personal Success” (F0804 or W0804)
“Leadership III for Fire and EMS: Strategies for Supervisory Success” (F0805 or W0805)
“Shaping the Future” (F0602 or W0602)

Managing Officer Program Capstone Project

The Managing Officer Program Capstone Project allows you to apply concepts learned in the program toward the solution of a problem in your home district.
You and the chief of your department (or equivalent in nonfire organizations) must meet to identify a problem and its scope and limitations. The scope of the project should be appropriate to your responsibilities and duties in the organization, and it should be appropriate to the Managing Officer Program. Possible subjects include:

  • Lessons learned from one of the core courses required in the Managing Officer Program.
  • Experiences of the Managing Officer as identified in the IAFC Officer Development Handbook, Second Edition.
  • An issue or problem identified by your agency or jurisdiction.
  • Lessons learned from a recent administrative issue.
  • Identification and analysis of an emerging issue of importance to the department.

Before initiating the project, you must submit a letter from your chief indicating the title of the project, projected outcomes, how it will be evaluated or measured, and approval for the project to go forward. When the project is completed, your chief must submit a letter indicating that it was completed successfully.

http://www.usfa.fema.gov/nfa/managing_officer_program/index.shtm